On Jan 15, 2005, at 4:41 AM, Kero wrote:

>> The second strategy used was to treat each digit as a series of 
>> segments that
>> can be "on" or "off".  The numbers easily break down into seven 
>> positions:
>>
>> 	 6
>> 	5 4
>> 	 3
>> 	2 1
>> 	 0
>>
>> Using that map, we can convert the two above to a binary digit, and 
>> some did:
>>
>> 	0b1011101
> [snip]
>
> So why not use:
>
> LCD = [
>   "-|| ||-",  # 0
>   "  |  | ",
>   "- |-| -",
>   "- |- |-",
>   " ||- | ",
>   "-| - |-",  # 5
>   "-| -||-",
>   "-||  | ",
>   "-||-||-",
>   "-||- |-",
> ]
>
> catching the bits and the shapes at the same time.

Well, it's trivial to infer the "-" or "|" from the position of the 
bit, but to directly answer your question, some did:

http://www.io.com/~jimm/rubyquiz/quiz14/

http://ruby-talk.com/blade/126180

>> The third strategy caught my eye, so I'll examine it here.  Let's look
>> at the primary class of Dale Martenson's solution:
>>
>> 	class LCD
>> 	   attr_accessor( :size, :spacing )
>> 	
>> 	   #
>> 	   # This hash is used to define the segment display for the # given
>> 	   digit. Each entry in the array is associated with # the following
>> 	   states:
>> 	   #
>> 	   #    HORIZONTAL
>> 	   #    VERTICAL
>> 	   #    HORIZONTAL
>> 	   #    VERTICAL
>> 	   #    HORIZONTAL
>> 	   #    DONE
>
> My main program looked like
>
> hor(0)
> ver(1, 2)
> hor(3)
> ver(4, 5)
> hor(6)
>
> replacing the statemachine.
>
> Ah well. This was actually the first Ruby Quiz I made.
> Partially because it looked like it was really short to work out.
> Thanks!

Thank you for following along.

> (perhaps next time I'll even submit it :)

I hope you will.  We can't learn great tricks from it if you don't 
share.

James Edward Gray II