"Glenn Parker" <glenn.parker / comcast.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:41E7D1BE.3040805 / comcast.net...
> Robert Klemme wrote:
> > "PA" <petite.abeille / gmail.com> schrieb
> >
> >>On Jan 13, 2005, at 18:27, Lothar Scholz wrote:
> >>>But only very few of them are a good choice, and thats a bad thing.
> >>
> >>Why? The fact that there are so much choice, both good and bad, force
> >>you to make/take decisions. This is a positive thing by itself.
> >
> > Not necessarily: these frameworks are meant to make people's lives
easier,
> > i.e. be more productive and thus faster.  If it takes too much time to
> > make a informed decision about the best choice then there are
definitely
> > too much options to choose from - or too little information that makes
> > deciding possible without trying out all options.
>
> I think it's pretty pointless to ask the world to stop writing free
> software, just because it might confuse some folks.

Please note that I never made this request.  I just questioned the
statement that it's a good thing to have many options to choose from.
It's not, at least not if the decision takes considerable amount of time -
be it because of the sheer amount of options or the difficulty to collect
the necessary information.

>  There are also a
> lot of computer languages to choose from (none of them perfect), but we
> all seem to manage somehow.  We pick one, use it for a while, fail or
> succeed, and learn from the experience, then move on.  You don't have to
> try everything to find happiness, but it's a rare event when you hit a
> home run on the first try.

Yeah, but that process takes time, which some folks might not have.

> A plethora of frameworks is a good thing, if only because it educates a
> few more developers about what makes a good framework.  Something as
> complicated as a real-life framework is full of twists and turns, and
> why should we discourage anybody from getting out there and taking a
spin?

I certainly don't want to do that.

> The good stuff will, by definition, float to the top without any
> negative pressure on competing projects.  Instead of stomping on the
> stuff you don't like, how about supporting the stuff you do like?
> Instead of complaining about too many choices, how about making a choice
> and sharing your experiences?

Currently I'm in the (lucky?) situation that I don't have to choose
between Ruby web frameworks simply because I don't have the need. :-)

Kind regards

    robert