Measuring a language's performance is a difficult task. ML posts and suchlike.

TIOBE software maintains a language popularity index at
http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm Language popularity indices are not
accurate, but they give an idea.

For a recent conf, I needed data on Ruby's growth. Tiobe provided me
with some data. You can see a graph of Ruby's growth here:
http://www.livejournal.com/~premshree/44232.html


On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 01:16:51 +0900, gabriele renzi
<rff_rff / remove-yahoo.it> wrote:
> Thursday ha scritto:
> > Darren Crotchett wrote:
> > [snip]
> >
> >> Also, is the Ruby community experiencing a lot of growth or what?
> >> TIA,
> >> Darren
> >>
> >
> > Growth can be measured in a number of ways.
> >
> > I'll just mention 2 that come immediately to mind.
> >
> > 1. number of books on the topic
> >
> > The lack of English books and documentation were Ruby's greatest area of
> > weakness compared to other languages.  About 5 years ago, I'd be
> > hard-pressed to find a single Ruby book written in English.
> >
> > But that has changed.  We now have Programming Ruby 2nd Ed. which is hot
> > off the press.  More well-known series of tech books now include Ruby
> > such as "Ruby in a Nutshell" and "Teach Yourself Ruby in 21 days".  At
> > this rate, I wouldn't be surprised to see a "Ruby Bible" and "Ruby for
> > Dummies" soon.  There are at least a half-dozen English books on Ruby
> > now, all published within the past few years.
> >
> > When I visit Borders bookstore, I still don't see Ruby books on the
> > shelves (only one or two Ruby books--and infrequently).
> 
> notice that there are books that do not have ruby in the cover but use
> it inside, the first I can think of is 'code generation in action', but
> I recall there were others.
> 
> 


-- 
Premshree Pillai
http://www.livejournal.com/~premshree