On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 05:52:25 +0900
zuzu <sean.zuzu / gmail.com> wrote:

> On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 05:45:37 +0900, Carlos <angus / quovadis.com.ar> wrote:
> > [zuzu <sean.zuzu / gmail.com>, 2004-12-11 21.13 CET]
> > 
> > 
> > > but a programmer cannot
> > >
> > >    "this is a string".puts
> > >
> > > and produce the desired result.  instead the programmer must
> > >
> > >    puts "this is a string"
> > >
> > > switching from postfix to prefix notation, most likely intuitive
> > > because of experience C-style printf() or C++ style cout (or i suppose
> > > BASIC).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > however, i suppose the real answer should be "shut up and code it that
> > > way for yourself then".  but i want to throw this out there for
> > > discussion as to why this was implemented in this way to begin with,
> > > as well as gather information from those who know offhand where the
> > > source of this lies in the default object library.
> > 
> > You have Object#display. But nobody uses it...
> 
> thank you as well, with an even more complete answer.
> (maybe someday ri will work by default on osx/darwin.)
> 
> from a language design perspective, or perhaps this is a ruby idomatic
> / programmer organization behavior perspective, any clues as to why
> nobody uses it?
> 
> is it just obscure?  not well documented in english (or at all)?  just
> not the way most programmers think due to their path-dependency (i.e.
> first language learned, and all that...)?
> 
> [snip]

I can only tell from my experience. I never run across this, because I never
searched for it. I wanted to output something, so I searched for print, found
put and was not surprised at all...

So maybe the first languages learned where all very suggestive to me. What made
me enthusiastic about ruby is, that I can simply express myself the way I
expected to express myself. When trying to do logical (prolog) or purely
functional (haskell) programming, I always thought "intriguing idea, but I
can't map my mind to it". In ruby I can mix functional and imperative
programming and hack away - but without me noticing it my mind got/gets
transformed. I think ruby made me a better programmer in lots of ways. Maybe
someday I will even no longer ask the Kernel to display an object, but ask the
object to display itself. Or maybe I won't, because I always thought the other
way round.

Well, this became quite some prosa, but maybe it helps someone or at least
someone can find herself reflected in it.

Regards,

Brian

-- 
Brian Schr?der
http://ruby.brian-schroeder.de/