While I lack the chops to write it (which is why I want it so badly),
I'd love to see a book on Inversion of Control/Dependency Injection
with Needle.

-pate


On Fri, 10 Dec 2004 10:52:18 +0900, Dave Thomas <dave / pragprog.com> wrote:
> Gentle Ruby folk:
> 
> I'm hoping to launch a new series of books from The Pragmatic
> Bookshelf. "Facets of Ruby" will a a set of small, focussed, and
> technical books about different aspects of Ruby. And I'm looking for
> folks to write them!
> 
> I have no fixed ideas on the titles, but to give you an idea of the
> kinds of things I'm looking for, you might well see books come out
> named something like:
> 
>    * Writing Ruby Extensions
>    * Using Ruby in the Semantic Web
>    * Creating E-Commerce Sites using Rails
>    * Rapid Application Development with Iowa
>    * Migrating from Java to Ruby
> 
> The intent is to create a series of books with a deeply practical
> focus. We won't just document APIs. Instead, we want to show how to get
> _value_ from those APIs---how to solve real-world problems. The books
> will probably be 100-250 pages long, and full of code.
> 
> To do this, I'm hoping to attract the best and the brightest--the folks
> who know. Which is why I'm posting the message to this list.
> 
> If you've always fancied writing a book on some aspect of Ruby, now's
> your chance.  When you work with us, you'll get to use a tool chain
> that's the envy of the publishing industry in an extremely agile
> production environment. We'll sell the books (in paper and PDF form)
> off our web site, and the world-class O'Reilly team will distribute the
> physical books to books stores and online retailers world-wide. Our
> royalty scheme is simple, transparent, and generous.
> 
> You won't get rich--that's pretty much impossible in the technical book
> market. But we'll have fun, and hopefully build a world-class resource
> for the growing Ruby community.
> 
> If you're interested, send me an e-mail at
> 'mailto:facets-of-ruby / pragprog.com' containing a single paragraph
> summary of the book you want to write. If we want to take a particular
> project further, we'll then ask for an outline and a short extract from
> the book. If everything works out, we'll then go on to write a book.
> 
> Just to get the ball rolling, I'm just starting to write the second
> book in the series (if you count PickAxe II as the first)---I'm working
> on an introduction to Rails.
> 
> Cheers
> 
> Dave
> 
>