On Wed, 3 Nov 2004 01:00:56 +0900, Zach Dennis <zdennis / mktec.com>
wrote:
> Ok here is a quick 2 cents while I have quick 5 minute break at
> work...
> 
> 1. I do not like Kerry because I do not believe things like
> Healthcare should be government backed, provided, etc...

... whereas I believe that healthcare should be out of the hands of
those interested in high profit margins. Note that the US has a
situation worse than Canada, because of HMOs, who are more stingy
than the Canadian government.

> The more control the government has over things the less choice
> each individual american gets. Also if the government plans to
> help with healthcare, and they are going to make sure everyone is
> and can be covered by the government provided healthcase that
> wants to be then where is the money coming from?

Group purchasing drives costs down. Way down.

> Healthcare isn't cheap, and I'm not a big fan of running
> government provided healthcare like Canada where the income tax is
> some absurd number at or above 50%.

Zach, speaking as a dual-US and Canadian citizen, your numbers are
bunk. My annual income tax hovers somewhere around 30% of my total
income. For this, I have a much calmer and more stable society, high
quality healthcare, excellent schools (that pay their teachers
living wages), and many other benefits. When I lived in the US, when
I calculated state, federal, and local income taxes together, I was
paying about 26%, IIRC. On top of that, I had a $15 co-pay to see a
doctor on EVERY VISIT (no co-pay here in Canada), and I felt less
safe -- and teachers were paid absolute crap.

I had one year here in Canada where I made a LOT of money and paid a
lot of money in taxes, but the total income tax rate was under 35%.

Yes, there's two sales taxes in my province, totaling 15%. Some
places in the US have 11.5% or higher sales taxes, and I've
encountered precious few places that don't have some level of sales
tax (usually 5 - 7%). But in no way does the total tax rate match
your absurd 50% figure. For anyone in Canada. Not since the
timeframe where the US had insanely high tax rates, too.

So, now that we've debunked the tax numbers, let's tackle your
misconceptions about the cost of healthcare. The US spent 14.9% GDP
on healthcare in 2002. In the same period, Canada spent 10.7% GDP.
This includes any trips that were *required* outside of Canada and
were covered by provincial medical plans (necessary operations
outside of Canada because of specialist availability are covered by
provincial medical plans). This may not include the small percentage
of "queue jumpers", people who paid extra to travel to the US and
pay outrageous fees for examinations or operations themselves.

The US's healthcare costs are HIGHER than those in Canada.
Whodathunkit?

I really hate it when people say they are against things, but don't
actually bother to do the research that would show that their
preconceptions and assumptions are not only wrong, but dead wrong.

If you want to discuss this off-list, feel free to email me. If you
haven't voted yet, you should change your mind and vote for him --
because he *hasn't* lied to you. Yet. Bush has. Repeatedly.

-austin
-- 
Austin Ziegler * halostatue / gmail.com
               * Alternate: austin / halostatue.ca