Google has made available an application that runs on a user?s PC, 
searching and indexing files much as the Google Web site does for the 
Internet. The application uses a Web browser for its user interface, 
which means that search results are also available to applications that 
know how to make HTTP requests.

The Google search app appears intended for Internet Explorer 5 or 
higher, running on Windows. However, it seems to work with Firefox, too. 
  But still, only for Windows.

GDeskRSS takes a set of keywords, runs a query, and parses the resulting 
HTML. The extracted data are then reformatted as an RSS 0.9 feed.

There are a few ways to run the code. You can call the main file, 
gdesk_rss.rb, from the command line:

  ruby gdesk_rss.rb <your keywords here>

The resulting RSS feed will spill across the command window, of dubious 
value, but you can at least see if that much works.

You can also run the code via WEBrick, using gdesk_brick.rb

  ruby gdesk_brick.rb [port_num]

If you omit the port number, the WEBrick instance runs on some default 
port other than 80 (likely 8090, but check the code in gdesk_brick.rb).

Another way to run the program is to use Catapult. Catapult is simple 
Ruby WEBrick app that runs code by dynamically loading classes and 
instantiating objects as specified via a URL.  I wrote it as a way to 
easily run local Web services on my PC without having to create a new 
WEBrick instance for each one, or rely on Apache.

See http://www.jamesbritt.com/code/catapult/ for details

GDeskRSS is mostly proof-of-concept, written to see 1) how hard it would 
be (not very), and 2) how useful RSS feeds tracking local file content 
might be (remains to be seen).

Hopefully others will find it useful and/or entertaining

See http://www.jamesbritt.com/code/gdeskSearchRSS/ for details and 
downloading version 0.1.0.



James Britt