Richard Kilmer wrote:
>
> On 10/6/04 3:11 PM, "Austin Ziegler" <halostatue / gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > On Thu, 7 Oct 2004 03:00:45 +0900, Richard Kilmer
> <rich / infoether.com> wrote:
> >> On 10/6/04 11:42 AM, "Eivind Eklund" <eeklund / gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> If we can make this possible, it would be great - I think it could
> >>> help raise adoption of Ruby a lot.  Conversely, if we make this
> >>> harder, we lower the adoption.
> >> I think you are ignoring a very important platform...Win32.
> Realize that
> >> Ruby is a very effective language for folks that merely want
> to automate
> >> their platform, and most computer users are running Win32
> (unfortunate, but
> >> true).  For them, they want binary versions of libraries and a
> graphical
> >> installer.  RubyGems does support win32, and will include a
> GUI for gems
> >> management.
> >
> > ...AND, we Win32 users don't want RubyGems (or any other packaging
> > system) cluttering our normal installer.
>
> Yes, well, _our normal installer_ is 11MB and growing, and it does not
> include every library in the Ruby community.  The idea is to provide a
> downloadable ruby installer with basics and a GUI to download any other
> library (as a gem) you want so you can work with them.  I support about 20
> different folks on my project here at DARPA who use Ruby on
> Win32...they are
> all different (from programmers to domain experts).  They have
> all suffered
> through trying to install various libraries at different times to
> help them
> use this language I taught them and they now really enjoy.  A
> gems-based GUI
> would help tremendously for Win32 users.

I'm the primary persono who has been maintaining the installer lately, and
this has been my plan. It's impossible to meet everyone's needs with a
single set of packages.

The idea is that the installer would include only an essential core and
would include the RubyGems browser to allow the user to pick additional
packages to install (either right then or any time later on). I would also
like to have a simplified set of categories or groups from which the user
can choose (like "Web Application Development") so that people who are not
familiar with the packages are not overwhelmed with meaningless (to them)
choices.

Curt