Here is how I did my RPMs. I downloaded the ruby RPM for my 
distribution (Mandrake, ruby-1.6.7), extracted the spec file, put it in 
the newer ruby tarball, changed a few things to match the current 
version of ruby, compile into a RPM binary. I attached a modified 
version of the spec file that *should* work on any other RPM based 
distro.

% tar zxf ruby-1.8.1.tar.gz
% cp <file_from_attachement> ruby-1.8.1/ruby.spec
% tar zcf ruby-1.8.1.tar.gz ruby-1.8.1
% rpm -ta ruby-1.8.1.tar.gz

If everything went fine, you should now have a binary and a source RPMs 
in (adjust path to your distro and architecture): 
/usr/src/RPM/RPMs/i586 and /usr/src/RPM/SRPMS.

Hope it helps,
Guillaume.

Le 26 sept. 04, ? 20:11, Markus a ?crit :

> On Sun, 2004-09-26 at 16:33, Gavin Sinclair wrote:
>> On Monday, September 27, 2004, 8:31:31 AM, Matt wrote:
>>
>>> On Mon, 27 Sep 2004, Markus wrote:
>>
>>>>     If all else fails, it's dirt simple to install from source,
>>>> generally nothing more than:
>>>>
>>>> ./configure
>>>> make
>>>> sudo make install
>>
>>> Yeah, but I have another 16 systems that are scheduled to be 
>>> installed.
>>
>>> Package managers are my friend.
>>
>>> And, yes, I've made this argument before.  The vast majority of 
>>> folks here
>>> are incredibly talented developers.  However, managing production 
>>> systems
>>> requires a different set of priorities.
>>
>> I'm not suggesting you should do this, just curious as to what's
>> involved: creating your own RPM.  If you built it from source on one
>> machine, can you easily create an RPM for managing all machines?
>
>      I gather making your own RPM fairly simple (disclaimer: I've
> delegated the task but not done it myself).
>
>      The other option which we frequently use which dates back to 
> before
> RPMs is to have a build CD (which may in fact be an NFS mount) with a
> script that runs a bunch of other scripts in a sub-directory tree.  We
> run this script at an appropriate point the setup of new machines.  In
> this set up, it really is dirt simple to have a script that does the
> configure-make-make boogie but doesn't require manual intervention.
>
> -- Markus
>
>
>