Dave Thomas wrote:

> 
> On Sep 11, 2004, at 7:21, James Britt wrote:
> 
>> Is there some way to simply say,  "Rdoc this arbitrary file and set it 
>> as the main page"?
> 
> 
> Does putting it as the first file on the command line not work?


That was what I was trying at first.  There is a specific Ruby source 
file I wanted to serve as the main doc page, so passed the path as the 
first file.  But none of the paths made rdoc happy.

Passing in the name of a class worked, but that likely won't help for a 
general text file.

As an experiment, I tried to specify a file in the current directory 
(while rdocing code in a subdirectory):

   rdoc -m README.txt lib\OOo4R

The file README.txt exists in the current directory, but rdoc reports 
that it cannot find it.

   rdoc -m ./README.txt lib\OOo4R

doesn't work either (nor .\README.txt).  Even passing in the complete 
windows file path does not help.

But, on re-reading your suggestion, I tried again, omitting the -m and 
just passing in the relative path to README.txt as the first argument.

This works, but seems a little counter-intuitive, given that the 
command-line help says to use " -m name " to set the initial page

My understanding now is to use "-m fully_qualified_name_of_class" to 
have the file defining that class appear as the initial page, or leave 
out the -m and just pass the path to the disk file to be used (after 
rdoc'ing) as the initial file.

Question:  If I pass rdoc a complete list of files, rather than a 
directory, will the files appear in list order in the Files frames?

That could be handy for pushing boring, least-used docs to the bottom.


Thanks,


James


> 
> Cheers
> 
> Dave
> 
> 
>