> Reverse-engineering is only one aspect. LGPL forces
> us to ALLOW 
> MODIFICATIONS to our program by users.
> 
> Imagine selling a version of software limited to 2
> CPUs to a bank.  And 
> then the bank modifies your software to run on 32
> CPU servers.
> 

This is why I will never ever use LGPL in commercial
non-open software that I care about.

> Or selling a standard edition of your product at a
> huge discount and 
> then having customers modify it to work just like
> the professional or 
> enterprise versions.
> 

Yep, there are tons of great assembly coders who can
easily do this(*despite how much assembly code there
is to write).

> Soo....statically link your commercial app to
> Fox-Toolkit and you're 
> required to allow reverse engineering of your app
> and allow users to 
> modify your app (per Section 6 of LGPL).

Yes, you might as well have it opensource :)

This was the intention of the LGPL. It is so
commercial application are still considered "free to
public" for making any modifications. 

--David Ross


		
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