At Tue, 20 Jul 2004 21:36:25 +0900,
Curt Hibbs wrote:

> These are excellent solutions. Unfortunately, they only work for Windows.
> I'm not aware of anything comparable for Mac or 'nix systems.

Yep, you are right, it would be interesting to have tools similar as
Exerb and RubyScript2Exe for Mac, Linux and BSD systems. And an
installer on those platforms would also be nice (maybe Loki
installer).

> > I don't really understand why you think it would be a problem to ask
> > the user to install the ruby interpreter (the one-click installer),
> > since you seem to think it would not be a problem to ask the user to
> > first install for example a JVM to run a Java program... ?
> 
> Again, this would be a Windows-only solution.

Wasn't it mentioned before on the list that work is planned/ongoing
for making a one-click installer on other platforms ?

> Anyone who wants to take this approach can do it without the one-click
> installer -- you can just install a private version of Ruby used only to run
> your app. FreeRIDE does this for its Windows installation (and we have been
> considering doing this for other platforms). If you want to see how this
> works, install FreeRIDE on windows and take a look at the startup script
> "run.bat".

If i would 'package' a ruby application for linux, then i would either
do as you said (the ruby interpreter is not that big and then you're
sure your application runs on the ruby version you tested/developed it
on), or either i would make a package (ebuild for Gentoo, rpm for
redhat/mandrake, deb for debian) that depends on the ruby-package
(this has the advantage that you can easily upgrade the ruby
interpreter for better performance, bugfixes,...).

(Now that i think about it, most commercial java-applications do
include a specific JVM in the installation, don't they ?)

> > That being said, I would love to see a compiler (to bytecode or to
> > native code) for ruby too, but then who doesn't ?
> 
> Me, too! Anyone who is really interested in this and has some available time
> should considering helping the Cardinal project get ruby working with the
> Parrot VM.

".. has some available time..."  i think that's the biggest problem
for a lot of people... Even if you're knowledgeable enough about
compilers, then it still takes some time to 'get into' the Cardinal
project and see what they have and how things work, before you can
really contribute to it. (at least, that's how i feel about it)

Ruben