On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 07:01:24 +0900, Matthew Margolis
<mrmargolis / wisc.edu> wrote:
> 
> 
> Sean O'Dell wrote:
> 
> >On Saturday 10 July 2004 13:57, Dave Thomas wrote:
> >
> >
> >>On Jul 10, 2004, at 15:11, Sean O'Dell wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Crazy idea: a website that lets people search the entire contents of
> >>>the book,
> >>>
> >>>
> >>Wouldn't a PDF let you do this?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >You could release the web site at the same time as the book and not worry
> >about people pirating a PDF around.
> >
> >       Sean O'Dell
> >
> >
> >
> It is very easy to download an entire web page for distribution.  I have
> a few C++ doc sites downloaded so I can read them when I am traveling.
> Using a freeware program I had the entire site on my hard drive in just
> a few seconds.
> I don't think a pdf or web page can offer any real security in terms of
> distribution.  Even if you password protect a pdf the document can be
> distributed by a sharer with a text file containing the access code.
> So in short, if they put a version online and the Ruby community grows
> enough someone will probably start illegal distribution.  As someone who
> hopes to one day be published this makes me unhappy but it is the way
> things seem to work with any sufficiently large community and a
> copyrighted work.
> 
> -Matthew Margolis
> 
> 

someone could OCR the hardcopy and release an illicit PDF as well. 
many a .ru domain have my favorite fictions by neal stephenson,
william gibson, greg egan, et. al.

to make the belabored point, if people can view data they can save and
redistribute that same data.  copy protection / drm is all smoke and
mirrors.  only compiling software gets away with such trickery as well
as it does because really the computer views the data, not a person.

unless we're writing books for computers to read to themselves now?

-z