Wrote Sean O'Dell <sean / celsoft.com>, on Tue, Jun 15, 2004 at 11:36:18AM +0900:
> On Monday 14 June 2004 19:09, Sam Roberts wrote:
> > Quoteing sean / celsoft.com, on Tue, Jun 15, 2004 at 09:40:26AM +0900:
> > > On Monday 14 June 2004 16:46, Zach Dennis wrote:
> > > But no one designed unix with KDE or even X-Windows in mind.  KDE could
> > > very easily be just as difficult and cryptic to everyday users as
> > > anything else in *nix.  It's not that KDE can now afford to be easy to
> > > use because *nix laid the foundation.  What about Macs, Windows and Beos?
> > >  Those aren't (well, OS X is) based on a Linux core, and they're easy to
> > > use.
> > >
> > > No, I stand by what I said.  New talent is working around Linux these
> > > days and things are getting easier to use, as well as remaining, or being
> > > more, powerful.
> >
> > It looks like new money to me, not new developers. Most of the big
> > projects are heavily funded by industry, either ones who sell the
> > software for money (KDE), or because it gives them a competetive edge
> > (Sun funding Samba development... they want their servers to be able to
> > be Windows domain controllers and file servers), gcc, Apache, even
> > GNOME.
> 
> It's not new money.  KDE doesn't have the money IBM or Sun have/had.  Unless I 
> missed something.

KDE has more money than Tom's Window Manager did.

> I also see loads of new projects coming out that aren't funded at all that 
> beat out older *nix projects.  Take Sendmail for example.  Sendmail *is* 
> commercial and funded.  Exim is not.  Exim is a terrific replacement for 
> Sendmail; has most if not all (now) of Sendmail's functionality, and is so 
> much easier to learn and master, it's hardly comparable.

Exim was developed by the University of Cambridge, it may not be
commercial, but it wasn't some guy working in his basement, either.

ISPs using exim are contributing paid company hours into maintaining and
adding enhancements to it. There are thousands (10s of thousands?) more
ISPs today than there were 10 years ago.

Matz is payed to work on ruby full-time.

O'Reilly pours money into OS development.

> It's better developers.  Linux is growing in popularity, and programmers 
> usually making big bucks in large commercial sectors are devoting more of 
> their free time to open source projects.

Those developers are using Linux in large commercial sectors, and many
of those developers are contributing paid company hours to working on
it.

Cheers,
Sam

-- 
Sam Roberts <sroberts / certicom.com>