On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 16:36:27 +0200, Robert Klemme wrote:

> 
> "Rasputin" <one / nowhere.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> news:pan.2004.06.11.20.50.29.369372 / nowhere.net...
>> Why in the world is there a warning, *even with brackets*, for assignments
>> in conditionals.
> 
> There are not always warnings; it seems, it's only warned if the right side
> is a literal (i.e. a string or a number).  This is reasonable because it is
> likely that a comparison was meant.  After all, what do you gain by doing
> 
> if ( x = 10 )
> end
> 
> over
> 
> if ( 10 )
> end
> 
> ?

Actually, I don't think(not sure about this though) that Ruby actually
knows, whether the number/string/whatever is in the literal(?) form, or
if it's a return value from a function, beyond the parser level.
Therefore, checking for it should be hard (or better yet, a waste of
cycles).

Personally, I think this warning should be allegated to the
 $VERBOSE == true  level. (Those would be much easier to ignore)

What I wanted to do was check if an array contained a certain value, and
do something with it, or else. Simple matter.

Just a mite obfusticated, if at all. So I think the stuff above made
sense... (It was short and to the point anyway (i think...))

But this is just going to be a matter that will be discussed my many
without anyone changing their minds (not really they won't).

I mean should we go for short elegant code irritating-waste-of-spacers.
Ha.