Michael Campbell wrote:
> On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 01:03:27 +0900, Sean O'Dell <sean / celsoft.com> wrote:
> 
> 
>>Ditto.  When hiring an artist, should one be wary of people who want to be an
>>artist forever?  When hiring a gardener, should one be wary of people who
>>want to garden forever?  I don't see the logic in refusing to hire a person
>>because they love their work and want to keep doing it the rest of their
>>life.
> 
> This translates to me to not wanting to learn, and that I can do without.

I think we're all talking past each other here.

My opinion is, I want to be a programmer as long as I possibly can. That
doesn't involve my skills or my job remaining static. It demands that
they change continually.

So it does NOT translate into stagnation or a lack of interest in
learning -- the exact opposite, I would say.

If you don't keep pace with technology and grow in your own field,
you won't BE a programmer in fifteen years.

Instead you'll be a manager of the breed I have had over and over --
ex-COBOL programmers who never heard of OOP and are now paper-pushers.
Except in 2020 you'd be an ex-Java programmer.

That is why I don't consider becoming a manager to be an "advancement"
even though it may be more salary or prestige. Most of the managers
I know became managers by being too tired or too stupid to keep up with
the industry changes.

Just my opinion...

Hal