Hi,

From: "Gregory Millam" <walker / lethalcode.net>
>
> How does obfuscating solve your problem? How is that even
> a problem? Just include a compiled ruby interpreter for
> your target platform, and have a link in your code that
> says "For more info about ruby and to download the
> interpreter, go to www.ruby-lang.org" ...
> 
> Obfuscaters serve no real use - as long as somebody can pass
> your code through a lexer, it's instantly unobfuscated.

I imagine the obfuscation would include translation of once-
meaningful identifiers (variable names, method names, ...)
into meaningless gibberish.  A lexer would not help much there.

Such an obfuscator sounds really tough to write for Ruby
though...  I presume the string form of eval() would have
to be disallowed from referring to any code subject to
obfuscation...

I would be very interested in a working Ruby code obfuscator,
even given certain restrictions like that.  I'm writing an
application in Ruby that will likely be heavily pirated, like
a video game, as soon as a cracked copy of it becomes 
available.  As with video games, which i used to do for about
9 years professionally, we're just trying to delay the time it
takes for someone to produce a cracked version.  At least,
I'm presuming anyone needing a Ruby code obfuscator is probably
coming from the same situation.  That's why I'd like one anyway.
I'm developing in Ruby because I want to add features faster
than the competition.  (Not to mention how much fun programming
in Ruby is. :)  But I've gone into writing this app in Ruby
knowing I'm going to need *some* solution to delaying the
(inevitable) appearance of a cracked version of my app.  So I'm
very glad to hear Ken is working on such a technology, and
grateful he'd be willing to share it.


Regards,

Bill