On Mon, 31 May 2004 01:10:27 +0900, Shannon Fang wrote

> 2) The application may be hosted on a shared server provided by a 
> hosting company, in this case, I think the most appropriate option 
> might be PHP, because there aren't any hosting company offering 
> mod_ruby etc, as far as I know. However,

If there seemed to be a demand for it, I would consider it.  However, 
mod_ruby presents a can of worms for a hosting company, so it is no suprise 
that it is a hard feature to find on shared servers.

> 3) It may also be hosted on our own server, in this case, the apache 
> server will be dedicated to this application, so I guess the shared 
> memory problem of mod_ruby may not be a big issue.

If you are on your own server, it's not.  It then simply becomes an issue of 
good coding practices to make sure one piece of code doesn't walk on another.
 
> In fact I am quite happy with the style of ASP or PHP (mixed code 
> with HTML), but not so happy with the language used, so I would try 
> to use ruby.  I am also interested in template system, but I am not 
> sure if they are "self-contained" or not, i.e., can I do 
> *everything* in the template system, including database 
> read/write... and do I need to use mod_ruby or eRuby in addition to 
> the template system... I will read more about the Rail and kwartz system.

Kwartz is a templating system that is language agnostic.  A Kwartz template 
can be used with a variety of languages, including both PHP and Ruby, and 
the resulting code generated from the Kwartz template is very fast.

More information can be found here: http://www.kuwata-lab.com/kwartz/


Amrita is a well entrenched Ruby templating system.  One of the main knocks 
against it is that it is memory hungry.  However, it has a lot of users and 
is pretty powerful:

http://www.brain-tokyo.jp/research/amrita/rdocs/


Cerise is a web application framework that uses Amrita templates.  It has 
some very nice features and has been around for quite a while.  It's 
probably the most downloaded of the Ruby application frameworks.

http://cerise.rubyforge.org


Ruby on Rails has not been publically released, yet.  However, there will be 
a lot of people who really like it when it is.  It is a nice piece of work.


Iowa is a web application framework & templating system that can be used for 
applications or for regular dynamically generated web pages.  It seperates 
content from code is quite stable, currently being used on a bunch of 
production sites, some running for as long as 2 years under it with no 
problems.  You can find out more about it at:

http://iowa.rubyforge.org


Borges is another application framework that has some very nice features for 
the application developer.  It uses continuations to provide a very linear 
and traditional feel for the application developer.  It is kind of a son (or 
grandson?) of Iowa:

http://borges.rubyforge.org


As you can see, there are a lot of different choices.  There are a few other 
good ones that I haven't mentioned (such as CGIKit).  My advice would be to 
read some of the documentation available on each of these and then try to 
find one that suits your preferences best.


Kirk Haines