Hi Lyle,

Thanks for these add'l details.  There were so many responses on this thread
that I missed this particular post until I checked back today.

Again,  thanks for all your insights.

Regards,
Richard

"Lyle Johnson" <lyle / knology.net> wrote in message
news:40AD6930.1060208 / knology.net...
> Richard Lionheart wrote:
>
> > As I understand your advice,  which I've tried and it works (as you
> > expected),  is to drop \fox from the first and prefix fox/ in the
latter.
> > (BTW,  prefixing fox\ does NOT work, despite the fact I running
Win2000Pro
> > ... it looks like the conversion from \ to / happens when the
environment is
> > first accessed.)
>
> Yes, I would guess that if you do something like:
>
> require 'fox\responder'
>
> that Ruby is interpreting the '\' character as an escape code or
> something. I just always use the '/' character as the path separator for
> require() and it works fine.
>
> > It seems to me that the rationale underlying your approach is that I can
> > equally well reference other packages parallel to the fox folder without
> > changing RUBYLIB each time.
>
> Yes, sure. This is a pretty standard approach for most Ruby libraries.
>
> > I'd like to check one other issue:  in your judgement,  what's the
purpose
> > of the initial 'require "fox"' statement.  Hal speculated it references
the
> > fox.so library (interesting,  a Unix extension in a Windows environment)
and
> > that the interpreter has a built-in path to it  (its located in
> > Ruby\lib\ruby\site_ruby\1.8\i386-msvcrt).
>
> Sorry I didn't address that question in my previous response. Yes, Hal
> was correct that the 'require "fox"' line loads in the main extension
> file, fox.so. Most of the code that makes up the FXRuby extension is
> compiled C++ code and lives in this file. Some of the supporting code
> (e.g. responder.rb), which is written in Ruby, lives in the "fox"
> subfolder. And despite its extension (.so), fox.so is just your basic
> DLL on Windows. And yes, the path to it is built-in to the interpreter;
> you should be able to check to see what the default RUBYLIB is by typing:
>
> ruby -e 'puts $:'
>
> For example, on my Apple PowerBook (from which I'm sending this message)
> the above command prints:
>
> /sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8
> /sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/powerpc-darwin
> /sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby
> /sw/lib/ruby/1.8
> /sw/lib/ruby/1.8/powerpc-darwin
> .
>
> where "powerpc-darwin" is the OS, just like "i386-msvcrt" is on your PC.
>
> Hope this helps,
>
> Lyle
>
>


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