Richard Lionheart wrote:

> As I understand your advice,  which I've tried and it works (as you
> expected),  is to drop \fox from the first and prefix fox/ in the latter.
> (BTW,  prefixing fox\ does NOT work, despite the fact I running Win2000Pro
> ... it looks like the conversion from \ to / happens when the environment is
> first accessed.)

Yes, I would guess that if you do something like:

	require 'fox\responder'

that Ruby is interpreting the '\' character as an escape code or
something. I just always use the '/' character as the path separator for
require() and it works fine.

> It seems to me that the rationale underlying your approach is that I can
> equally well reference other packages parallel to the fox folder without
> changing RUBYLIB each time.

Yes, sure. This is a pretty standard approach for most Ruby libraries.

> I'd like to check one other issue:  in your judgement,  what's the purpose
> of the initial 'require "fox"' statement.  Hal speculated it references the
> fox.so library (interesting,  a Unix extension in a Windows environment) and
> that the interpreter has a built-in path to it  (its located in
> Ruby\lib\ruby\site_ruby\1.8\i386-msvcrt).

Sorry I didn't address that question in my previous response. Yes, Hal
was correct that the 'require "fox"' line loads in the main extension
file, fox.so. Most of the code that makes up the FXRuby extension is 
compiled C++ code and lives in this file. Some of the supporting code 
(e.g. responder.rb), which is written in Ruby, lives in the "fox" 
subfolder. And despite its extension (.so), fox.so is just your basic 
DLL on Windows. And yes, the path to it is built-in to the interpreter; 
you should be able to check to see what the default RUBYLIB is by typing:

	ruby -e 'puts $:'

For example, on my Apple PowerBook (from which I'm sending this message) 
the above command prints:

	/sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8
	/sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/powerpc-darwin
	/sw/lib/ruby/site_ruby
	/sw/lib/ruby/1.8
	/sw/lib/ruby/1.8/powerpc-darwin
	.

where "powerpc-darwin" is the OS, just like "i386-msvcrt" is on your PC.

Hope this helps,

Lyle