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On Tue, 10 Oct 2006, Thomas Enebo wrote:

> One issue with naming is if you choose something too synonymy it becomes 
> difficult to separate the meaning between them:  to_a, to_ary, to_list. 
> No suggestion. Just an observation that new Ruby users will end up 
> getting pretty confused if they cannot distinguish between these method 
> names.

Makes me think of a programming language in which the [pix_film] class is 
for reading a series of images from a file while [pix_video] is for 
reading a series of images from an input device, and while [pix_movie] is 
again something else that I don't remember what it is. Not having some 
dated preconceptions about film vs video, and not wanting any of those 
preconceptions to cling to me, that naming is something I hate.

(I'm teaching a workshop on that programming language next week)

Ruby doesn't have the problem of historical preconceptions in this case, 
but it still has the problem of hairsplitting and not giving any kind of 
guessable names to this.

> -Tom "Stater of the obvious"

To someone who's too in it, it's easy to not see what's too obvious, 
because it's too close to the eye, which is not in the field of vision. 
That's why it's important to talk about the obvious (well, sometimes).

  _ _ __ ___ _____ ________ _____________ _____________________ ...
| Mathieu Bouchard - t˝═:+1.514.383.3801 - http://artengine.ca/matju
| Freelance Digital Arts Engineer, Montr˝┬l QC Canada
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