Issue #8948 has been updated by ko1 (Koichi Sasada).


Now we can't run `make test-all` because `test/lib/test/unit.rb` defines singleton method for a regexp object.

```
      def non_options(files, options)
        filter = options[:filter]
        if filter
          pos_pat = /\A\/(.*)\/\z/
          neg_pat = /\A!\/(.*)\/\z/
          negative, positive = filter.partition {|s| neg_pat =~ s}
          if positive.empty?
            filter = nil
          elsif negative.empty? and positive.size == 1 and pos_pat !~ positive[0]
            filter = positive[0]
          else
            filter = Regexp.union(*positive.map! {|s| Regexp.new(s[pos_pat, 1] || "\\A#{Regexp.quote(s)}\\z")})
          end
          unless negative.empty?
            negative = Regexp.union(*negative.map! {|s| Regexp.new(s[neg_pat, 1])})
            filter = /\A(?=.*#{filter})(?!.*#{negative})/
          end
          if Regexp === filter
            # bypass conversion in minitest
            def filter.=~(other)    # :nodoc:   <-- singleton method!!
              super unless Regexp === other
            end
          end
          options[:filter] = filter
        end
        true
      end
```

Is it acceptable (should we allow such code)?


----------------------------------------
Feature #8948: Frozen regex
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/8948#change-66500

* Author: sawa (Tsuyoshi Sawada)
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: matz (Yukihiro Matsumoto)
* Target version: 
----------------------------------------
=begin
I see that frozen string was accepted for Ruby 2.1, and frozen array and hash are proposed in https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/8909. I feel there is even more use case for a frozen regex, i.e., a regex literal that generates a regex only once. It is frequent to have a regex within a frequently repeated portion of code, and generating the same regex each time is a waste of resource. At the moment, we can have a code like:

    class Foo
      RE1 = /pattern1/
      RE2 = /pattern1/
      RE3 = /pattern1/
      def classify
        case self
        when RE1 then 1
        when RE2 then 2
        when RE3 then 3
        else 4
        end
      end
    end

but suppose we have a frozen `Regexp` literal `//f`. Then we can write like:

    class Foo
      def classify
        case self
        when /pattern1/f then 1
        when /pattern1/f then 2
        when /pattern1/f then 3
        else 4
        end
      end
    end

=end



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