Issue #12958 has been updated by Robert A. Heiler.


Also see the discussion in https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12548 - ruby version changed
from 2.3.x to 2.4.x, so I think the change is fine. Default similar behaviour can be expected 
e. g. from 2.3.1 to 2.3.9 and such. Otherwise you'd have to release ruby 3.x when wanting to
do any change that alters behaviour - and this will be years in the future. I personally rather
like to have a great xmas ruby but I also understand that it adds burden to adapt tests.

Would perhaps be useful if there could be some additional classifications or filtering to have
a look what behaviour was changed, so that others can anticipate in time. Kinda a bit like
how github uses preset default tags and templates for "bug" or "enhancement" and such 
classifications. Then one could have a classification tag in addition to this stating something
like "API behaviour change" or something like that, and people could scan for these between
different ruby releases. This could make it a bit easier to write tests and anticipate what
is coming next.

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Bug #12958: Breaking change in how `#round` works
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12958#change-61587

* Author: Rafael Fran├ža
* Status: Open
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: 
* ruby -v: 
* Backport: 2.1: UNKNOWN, 2.2: UNKNOWN, 2.3: UNKNOWN
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We noticed in the Rails test suite that there is a breaking change in how `#round` works between 2.3 and 2.4

https://github.com/rails/rails/pull/27091

Is that desirable?

I think it is may cause a lot of problem if the behavior of `#round` without any arguments changes between a minor version.



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