Issue #12116 has been updated by Benoit Daloze.


Nice idea! +1

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Feature #12116: `Fixnum#divmod`, `Bignum#divmod` with multiple arguments
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12116#change-57538

* Author: Tsuyoshi Sawada
* Status: Open
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: 
----------------------------------------
Sometimes, I need to apply `divmod` repeatedly. For example, in order to convert a number expressing seconds into approx year, day, hour, minutes, seconds (approx in the sense of ignoring leap day and leap second), I can repeatedly apply `divmod`:

~~~RUBY
seconds = 289342751
minutes, seconds = seconds.divmod(60) # => [4822379, 11]
hours, minutes = minutes.divmod(60) # => [80372, 59]
days, hours = hours.divmod(24) # => [3348, 20]
years, days = days.divmod(365) # => [9, 63]
~~~

so that I get that 289342751 seconds is approx 9 years 63 days 20 hours 59 minutes and 11 seconds. But it is cumbersome to do all that. It would be convenient if `divmod` can take multiple arguments so that the conventional `divmod` is applied from the right-most argument to the left, returning the above result at once:

~~~RUBY
289342751.divmod(365, 24, 60, 60) # => [9, 63, 20, 59, 11]
~~~

In general, when `n` arguments are passed to the proposed `divmod`, an array of `n + 1` elements should be returned.


Another use case is nested arrays. Some people tend to express a matrix as a nested array, and try to access the innermost elements using multiple indices. To list the coordinates of the occurrences of `1`, one may do:

~~~RUBY
m = [
  [1, 0, 0],
  [0, 1, 0],
  [0, 0, 1],
]

a = []
m.each_with_index do |row, i|
  row.each_with_index do |e, j|
    a.push([i, j]) if e == 1
  end
end
a # => [[0, 0], [1, 1], [2, 2]]
~~~

But it is often easier to have a flat array and use `divmod` with it:

~~~RUBY
m = [
  1, 0, 0,
  0, 1, 0,
  0, 0, 1,
]

m.each.with_index.select{|e, _| e == 1}.map{|_, i| i.divmod(3)} # => [[0, 0], [1, 1], [2, 2]]
~~~

However, once the nesting achieves another level, it becomes cumbersome. Instead of using a nested array:

~~~RUBY
t = [
  [
    ["a", "b"],
    ["c", "d"],
  ],
  [
    ["a", "b"],
    ["c", "d"],
  ],
]
~~~

one can keep using a flat array, but that would require repeated application of `divmod` to covert between the flat index and the nested index. The proposed feature would also help in such case.



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