Issue #12142 has been updated by Shyouhei Urabe.


Very impressive work.  I'm excited to see your patch boosting ruby.

Almost everything I thought was already said by others; what remains curious to me is that it seems a long-lasting hash objects tends to leak memory with your patch.

~~~
zsh % for i in 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 10000000
zsh > do /usr/bin/time -f%Mkb ./miniruby -e "h=Hash.new; $i.times{|i|h[i] = i; h.delete(i-1)}"
zsh > done
3476kb
3484kb
3492kb
3540kb
3976kb
7528kb
36920kb
497868kb
zsh %
~~~

When you want to use a hash as an in-memory key-value store, it is quite natural for it to experience lots of random additions / deletions.  I think this situation happens in real-world programs.  Is this intentional or just a work-in-progress?

I'm also unsure about worst-case time complexity of your strategy.  At a glance it seems not impossible for an attacker to intentionally collide entries (hope I'm wrong).  On such situations, old hash we had did rebalancing called rehash to avoid long chains.  Is there anything similar, or you don't have to, or something else?

Anyways, this is a great contribution.  I wish I could do this.  I hope you revise the patch to reflect other discussions and get it merged.

----------------------------------------
Feature #12142: Hash tables with open addressing
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12142#change-57324

* Author: Vladimir Makarov
* Status: Open
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: 
----------------------------------------
~~~
 Hello, the following patch contains a new implementation of hash
tables (major files st.c and include/ruby/st.h).

  Modern processors have several levels of cache.  Usually,the CPU
reads one or a few lines of the cache from memory (or another level of
cache).  So CPU is much faster at reading data stored close to each
other.  The current implementation of Ruby hash tables does not fit
well to modern processor cache organization, which requires better
data locality for faster program speed.

The new hash table implementation achieves a better data locality
mainly by

  o switching to open addressing hash tables for access by keys.
    Removing hash collision lists lets us avoid *pointer chasing*, a
    common problem that produces bad data locality.  I see a tendency
    to move from chaining hash tables to open addressing hash tables
    due to their better fit to modern CPU memory organizations.
    CPython recently made such switch
    (https://hg.python.org/cpython/file/ff1938d12240/Objects/dictobject.c).
    PHP did this a bit earlier
    https://nikic.github.io/2014/12/22/PHPs-new-hashtable-implementation.html.
    GCC has widely-used such hash tables
    (https://gcc.gnu.org/svn/gcc/trunk/libiberty/hashtab.c) internally
    for more than 15 years.

  o removing doubly linked lists and putting the elements into an array
    for accessing to elements by their inclusion order.  That also
    removes pointer chaising on the doubly linked lists used for
    traversing elements by their inclusion order.

A more detailed description of the proposed implementation can be
found in the top comment of the file st.c.

The new implementation was benchmarked on 21 MRI hash table benchmarks
for two most widely used targets x86-64 (Intel 4.2GHz i7-4790K) and ARM
(Exynos 5410 - 1.6GHz Cortex-A15):

make benchmark-each ITEM=bm_hash OPTS='-r 3 -v' COMPARE_RUBY='<trunk ruby>'

Here the results for x86-64:

hash_aref_dsym       1.094
hash_aref_dsym_long          1.383
hash_aref_fix        1.048
hash_aref_flo        1.860
hash_aref_miss       1.107
hash_aref_str        1.107
hash_aref_sym        1.191
hash_aref_sym_long           1.113
hash_flatten         1.258
hash_ident_flo       1.627
hash_ident_num       1.045
hash_ident_obj       1.143
hash_ident_str       1.127
hash_ident_sym       1.152
hash_keys            2.714
hash_shift           2.209
hash_shift_u16       1.442
hash_shift_u24       1.413
hash_shift_u32       1.396
hash_to_proc         2.831
hash_values          2.701

The average performance improvement is more 50%.  ARM results are
analogous -- no any benchmark performance degradation and about the
same average improvement.

The patch can be seen as

https://github.com/vnmakarov/ruby/compare/trunk...hash_tables_with_open_addressing.patch

or in a less convenient way as pull request changes

https://github.com/ruby/ruby/pull/1264/files


This is my first patch for MRI and may be my proposal and
implementation have pitfalls.  But I am keen to learn and work on
inclusion of this code into MRI.

~~~



-- 
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-core-request / ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-core>