Issue #12004 has been updated by Andrew Vit.


Lisa Beld wrote:
> I would recommend the Contributor Covenant. People complaining that it includes harassment in public spaces are most likely just guilty of doing so. Just because the harassment occurs outside the scope of the project does not make it any more ok!

Please don't accuse people like me of harassing in public spaces without evidence, just because I disagree. That's not nice. My reasons are fairness and openness for everyone.

No, the real reason is that something happening outside of THIS project space and unrelated to it (let's say on Twitter) is not the responsibility of every other project I contribute to. Assuming I contribute to a dozen different gems, plus ruby, and basically some unknown number of projects that follow an open-ended CoC:

* Which project should an accuser take their grievance to? The most high-profile one, for the best drama?
* Which project should take enforcement up with me? Should I get ejected from all online spaces?
* Which project's rules am I bound by, should they be different between projects?
* Should all other projects I am part of be required to show solidarity with one project's resolution?

It's a misplaced sense of authority.

> It's quite obvious from this thread alone how toxic this community is, I can't believe so many people are essentially saying they don't want to stop harassing people by coming up with silly excuses as if a CoC was somehow implementing communism.

Disagreeing with a badly formulated policy is not "toxic". It's important to understand and agree to the contracts you enter before signing them. I'm sorry you feel it's toxic, but this is the first issue you've participated in here, and it's a huge detour from normal business. 

Since you bring up communism, that's just the identity politics behind this movement (special protections for underclasses)... "Formally, it may even be taken back to Marx's earliest statements about a class becoming conscious of itself and developing a class identity." are just recycled bad ideas.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_politics

It's a philosophical stance. I'd rather just deal with the specifics, but the rhetoric is all mixed up into this too.

> The responsibility of enforcing the code of conduct should be handed to a committee comprised of people who have more experience with harassment which is often not recognised by people with more privilege.

I don't believe in the religion of "privilege" and identity politics. Actually, I would argue that it's the most harmful idea in social relations in the last few years. We've gone astray from "a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character", to making race and sex a primary concern, and started class wars over it. That is sad. 

But, since I'm too "privileged" to understand, here's someone else's perspective on this, she explains this better than I could anyway:
http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/girls-and-software

----------------------------------------
Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56784

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
----------------------------------------
I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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