Daniel:

Codes of conduct don°«t exist to punish, believe it or not. They exist to
help project maintainers act *fairly* when behaviours go *off the rails*.
Sometimes those behaviours are always unacceptable (direct threats against
individuals, as an example°Ĺin this thread, the posting of anti-Semitic
materials would *definitely* qualify). Sometimes those behaviours are best
treated as a failure due to ignorance which should result in stern warnings
*with* an educational approach. And yes, sometimes those behaviours will be
pure misunderstanding because of the multinational/multilingual nature of
the wider Ruby community.

A good code of conduct recognizes these cases and provides guidance for
project maintainers and community managers so that there can be
clarification, education, and/or expulsion as appropriate to the nature of
the offence.

For those who want CoCs that don°«t include the consideration of behaviour
outside of the Ruby °»spaces°…. While I am sympathetic to notwanting random
thoughts to be used to exclude me from a group, it may be appropriate to
use non-°»space°… behaviours and evidence to help classify such behaviour. I
present a thought experiment based on a particularly unsavoury individual,
DV (often better known as R°Ĺ V). If he were to all of a sudden showup in a
Ruby °»space°…, there would be a lot of concern by people because this person
is extremely hostile to women. IMO, the adjudication of any claim of
harassment by DV would need to consider DV°«s history of hostility toward
women *even though it happened outside of a Ruby °»space°…* precisely because
it would inform whether this is a misunderstanding, ignorance, or
unacceptable (and yes, his history is such that it would pretty much land
on unacceptable).

-a

On Thu, Jan 28, 2016 at 5:14 PM, <6ftdan / gmail.com> wrote:

> Issue #12004 has been updated by Daniel P. Clark.
>
>
> Yukihiro Matsumoto wrote:
> > OK, that's enough.
> >
> > We will set up some form of CoC in the future. Let me think for a while
> which one we are going to choose.
> >
> > Matz.
>
> Thank you Matz for letting us know.
>
> Something I'd like people to keep in mind is that a majority of people
> will contribute to projects without first reading any conduct guidelines.
> So I encourage the assumption of good intent first, and possible ignorance
> second, before any action is considered a violation.
>
> If any remark seems to offend you then I ask that you first ask for
> clarification and intent behind the remark before assuming ill intent.  As
> is seen in this very thread when people speak in a language that is not
> their native language things can be misconstrued.
>
> ----------------------------------------
> Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
> https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56771
>
> * Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
> * Status: Assigned
> * Priority: Normal
> * Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
> ----------------------------------------
> I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open
> Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github
> that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant
> by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's
> Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse,
> rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an
> option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license
> selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the
> code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and
> Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby
> projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.
>
> Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting
> the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted
> by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting
> it for the core Ruby language as well.
>
> Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is
> define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness,
> courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from
> people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all
> contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other
> factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on
> these values with action when and if an incident arises.
>
> I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the
> adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that
> this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued
> welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full
> text of the Contributor Covenant at
> http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at
> http://contributor-covenant.org/.
>
> Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.
>
>
> ---Files--------------------------------
> Screen Shot 2016-01-22 at 6.45.23 PM.png (595 KB)
> Ruby_Code_of_Conduct_Numbers.png (119 KB)
> Ruby_Code_of_Conduct_Discussion.png (143 KB)
>
>
> --
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