Issue #12004 has been updated by B Meyers.


Yukihiro Matsumoto wrote:
> OK, that's enough.
> 
> We will set up some form of CoC in the future. Let me think for a while which one we are going to choose.
> 
> Matz.

For over 5 years now, I've been a Ruby developer. This discussion has to be on of the most disruptive topics I have ever read from the Ruby Community. In all of the other email threads and help posts, the Ruby Community has proven itself to be one of the nicest, most dedicated group of people I have had the honor to be a part of. And it is extremely disheartening to me to see how this conversation has devolved into personal attacks and attempts of discrediting one another. I can't help but find it ironic that everything the proposed CoC intends to solve, has manifested itself as part of the discussion.

Matz: **I love Ruby.** It is a fantastic language that I use every chance I get. I love the passion that I find in this community, and their willingness to write helpful blog posts to get new people to learn how to Ruby with the best of them. There seems to be no end of examples on how to deal with difficult problems. And it seems like for every big problem that "there's a Gem for that." You could say that I came for the language, and stayed for the community.

But that is also part of why I have never felt that Ruby needs any sort of CoC. At the end of the day, we are a technical community. We come from all walks of life to work on software together. It is that software that I see as the key to overcoming any adversity we face. If we can come together to write awesome code, then surely we have gotten passed the bigotry, politics, and idiocracy of the modern world to do so. And I don't see how any set of rules can serve to improve that. If we introduce rules, it should be to protect the great community we have today from becoming like the rest of the world.

It seems to me that any of the codes of conduct that have been presented only end up dividing us through labels which are completely insignificant to the code we are here to write. There are plenty of other communities for tackling the issues of society, and to me Ruby is not one of them. We are here to work, to learn, to teach, and even play. And I think that's more than enough.

Now, if we are to develop a set of guidelines for the Ruby Community, then I think it should look something like this:

## Ruby Community Guidelines

1. We are a technical community that is here to solve technical problems, not to solve the problems of society.
2. We are a diverse group of people from all walks of life who have come together to contribute to this community as students, teachers, collaborators, and developers. The only label we need is "Rubyist".
3. Discussion should be related to the Ruby language, programming, or software development.
4. Moderators are here to facilitate these discussions by keeping them civil and on topic. They are expected to take action appropriate to the situation, and may be held accountable if these actions are viewed by the community as overzealous or unnecessary.

Isn't this enough?

~B

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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56775

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
----------------------------------------
I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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