Issue #12004 has been updated by Gregory Brown.


I also support adopting a Code of Conduct.

I believe CC 1.3 is a good base to work from simply because it is already used on many well known projects. #275 provides the best outline I've seen of specifically what CC does that's important... but any other similar CoC that meets most of those points would probably do.

I dislike identity politics and I dislike the formal, harsh wording of CoC in general. I dislike the feeling of taking on the responsibility of consistently monitoring and enforcing these things in my own projects. I dislike that I had to spend a bit of time every week for a year making connections, doing research, and building trust with people from underrepresented groups just to begin hearing their personal stories about harassment, many of which would never have shared them in public out of fear of further harm.

I grew up in a "thick skin" internet age myself, so I personally prefer the "deal with it, fight back, or killfile" approach. That said, I live on top of a giant mountain of privilege, and on top of that run projects that I feel I have a greater responsibility to than simply serving my personal ideology. Few people in this thread have the leadership responsibilities to understand that aspect of things, so it makes sense for them to talk about what they personally prefer. Actual leaders of community projects need to think more carefully than that.

For me, I wasn't quick to decide that adding a code of conduct to a project was a good thing, and I shared many of the concerns expressed by the non-troll commenters on this thread. 

But the net effect of actually taking the time to listen and learn, not just to those active in social justice, but everyday people from many different backgrounds, was to find out... yes, this is a real problem. Sending a signal of support to those who have experienced that problem elsewhere in a way that's loud and clear is worth doing. A CoC is one of the basic tools that can set the stage for accomplishing that, and if we trust the maintainers of this project, that trust will be preserved even after a CoC is implemented.

However, if the core team decides not to act on this, or acts on this in a way that's half baked and idealistic, or acts in way that's meant to preserve the "nice" attitude rather than making an effective decision, you will lose the trust of many who have come to realize that community management involves a lot more than the purely technical aspect of things. There is at least one person in this thread that I've totally lost respect for already, who I've previously thought of as a very insightful voice in Ruby.

Matz, if you don't feel very well informed on this issue, or well prepared to make a decision on your own, please do seek advice from those you trust that do understand these problems. This thread creates (IMO) a false dilemma because very few people who are against introducing a CoC carry the same responsibility as you do as a leader of a very important project. Talk to other leaders you respect, who have had to make these decisions. See why they did what they did, and how they did it.

Don't let pressure from either social justice activists or those who would oppose them force your hand on this. If you get to the root of the issue, you'll be able to make a decision that is right for Ruby from your own heart. But please, on this issue, don't prioritize being nice over getting it right.

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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56723

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
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I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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