Issue #12004 has been updated by Andrew Vit.


Coraline Ada Ehmke wrote:
> Suggested draft for community guidelines. I've tried to incorporate language that other people have suggested without losing any context or important criteria.

Thank you for taking the time to rework this Coraline, doing that work is much more constructive than most of this debate... I acknowledge that you find this new one a compromise, but this should be a process, not an unthinking "YES", whatever the new document is called in the end.

Before commenting on it myself, I would like to let your proposal settle in to see where Matz and the core team stand on it compared to other proposals. (I like Jeremy's version too.) I do think this one can be improved, but no blockers. Let me just say: it's much better.

Let me also make it very clear here that I would like us to respect each other professionally, even when we disagree. I still stand against any assertion that we *need* this, but I've already made my case for that. Count my vote against, but that's done. I'm not so stubborn that if *something* is very likely going to be accepted, that I would continue working against the process.

Please read the rest if you care to understand my original disagreement more clearly. I might not convince you of anything, but I would appreciate if you take the time.

The way the text of your original CoC was proposed here implies that ruby-core has problems that nobody in the group can see. It's insulting to imply we are somehow harboring terrible people without it. The whole thing has become a tempest in a teapot when people loudly insist this is so very necessary out of a clear blue sky.

I knew of your CoC previously because of the Opal.rb drama. And then, CoC 1.3.0 is supposedly *even better* because it covers spaces outside the project, like Twitter. You claim anyone who disagrees with this kind of CoC just wants to continue harassing vulnerable people online. No, that's twisting things. Speaking for myself, I don't want to have my work destroyed and be shamed over an overheard "dongle joke" or something equally stupid. It's too easy to happen when a CoC makes it anyone's whim to do something like that, especially when you round up a shaming brigade and amplify it. So many seemingly innocuous things these days are "obviously" racist or sexist to a certain part of the American audience. I'd like to try and protect good people and good projects from that kind of abuse.

I'm also going to defend myself when I'm unfairly attacked. Outside of this thread, I have seen words like "wolves", "assholes", threats of ostracism from the greater community, and probably worse applied to anyone who didn't outright say "YES" enthusiastically to the CoC. Some of these negative comments are from people whose software we pay real $$ for, and software that many of us (including myself) have freely contributed work for. THAT is also deeply insulting. Even if it wasn't directed at me personally, I've lost some respect for people because of it.

I've been part of the ruby community for 10 years, taking part by helping newcomers on IRC, mailing lists, StackOverflow, tutoring new coders as well as peers, (never mind the more technical side of patching & maintaining gems, and a few times here in MRI ruby too). I don't want a medal for this, but if I just get abuse for that, why should I still care about OSS? I'll tell you: it's because of the other good people in the ruby community, and I will stand up for their rights too.

Your supporters are calling me and others who disagree politely names for debating your proposal and the whole ball of ideology that comes with it. How could we respect your proposal at all when that is happening? Everyone has the right to say "NO".

You have a lot of influence with some section of the community, so would you please tell your followers to act by the spirit of your own Code of Conduct and respect people outside of your social group?

Finally, yes I know there are trolls on this topic, and it's unfortunate. They do get removed (eventually), but maybe they also need to hear "please stop" from peers they respect before it escalates. (I like to think we respect each other as peers here, so hopefully that carries some weight.) I've always just ignored the trolls myself (I am not a moderator), but I should also do my part to signal that isn't welcome here. I can promise to do at least that when I see it. Thank you to others I've seen above who have done that.

So,

I want to keep my right to debate doubtful claims and ideas (inside or outside any project) without being unfairly attacked: challenge my ideas, not my character.

While I disagree with you, I've never called you or anyone else here names, so please don't do it back or enable others when they do it. It only erodes the level of respect for your CoC.

Disagreement means we have diversity: I think these are both important values and I want to protect both, maybe just differently than you. Can we at least shake hands on that?


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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56633

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
----------------------------------------
I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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