Issue #12004 has been updated by David Celis.


Robert Klemme wrote:
> David Celis wrote:
> > I feel that many comments made in this thread show "non niceness". But like myself and others have said, this is not about "non niceness", this is about an avenue to dealing with real harassment if and when it happens.
> 
> As others have pointed out already, there are laws for that.  So wouldn't a CoC be just stating "we abide by the law"?

I partly agree with you here, but the laws are hazy and online harassment is very rarely dealt with by law enforcement. I've seen hundreds of death threats online in my day and it's never the law that steps inI'd love for "we abide by the law" to be enough, but I don't think that it is.

> Maybe I did not make my point very clear: the *existence* of a CoC (or a law for that matter) does not solve any problem - it is people acting who solve problems - by abiding by the rules or enforcing them.  I guess you can find a law in every country that is ineffective, because it is not enforced or otherwise ignored.

Sorry, I think I need to be more clear here too! The problem that the existence of a CoC is meant to solve is to provide clear definition on what anti-harassment measures we're trying to be vigilant about enacting.

> OK, there *I* am being optimistic: for me the definition of "grown up" includes civilized manners. :-)



> > And while yes, a CoC is not required to remove people from the community for awful behavior, it is important to be able to state why someone was removed and why that behavior was awful.
> 
> And you cannot express that without reference to a CoC?  What about laws or the judgement of community moderators?  Btw. "awful" is not a good legal category, it is just too subjective and imprecise.

Yeah, "awful" is definitely a subjective word. I just used it as an umbrella for the listed sorts of harassing behaviors in the CoC. And sure, it can be expressed without reference to a CoC, but having that CoC as a document to express it in less ambiguous terms and in a visible spot helps.

> > It's also important to state how someone could be welcomed back if they choose to work hard at returning.
> 
> That seems to be an important point missing from the suggested CoC.

I agree; it's meant to be addressed by the phrasing "temporary or permanent removal from the community" but people _definitely_ seem to be very focused on the fact that permanent removal is possible. That is meant to be a very extreme and very last resort, but perhaps it can be worded differently to be more optimistic or realistic?

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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56587

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
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I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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