Issue #12004 has been updated by Benton Barnett.


Gordon King wrote:
> With so few, I think we can all be grateful that a decision that affects thousands of programmers in a 20 year old community isn't being decided by a poll of a few dozen self selected commentators. We can only, with appropriate humility, offer advice.

You are correct that this is not something that is decided by popular vote, of which I am also thankful for. The goal of a code of conduct is to protect the underprivileged, something that democracy has traditionally failed to do.

It's also worth noting that a small minority has dominated this thread. 8 people with newly created accounts, who also were against adding a code of conduct, are responsible for an overwhelming 54 comments in this thread. Compared to 24 people with newly created accounts who were for adding a code of conduct, who only posted 64 times. New accounts who are against the code of conduct are posting 4 times (!!!) as often as other people.

To clarify, most people in this thread post 2.77 times, on average. Except for people with new accounts who are also against adding a CoC, they post an average of 6.75 times. This means that a small fraction of the community is taking up far more of space than any other group, including long standing members of the Ruby community.

When Matz looks over this issue, I trust he will look at the quality--not quantity--of these posts.

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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56511

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
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I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.


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