Issue #12004 has been updated by ph ph.


It is useless to argue on the factual grounds of this "code of conduct". 
The purported niceness is the selling bit, but the clauses of exclusion of community members are the only *actionable* ones.
They are mostly illegal and can make some legal entity liable to damage caused to a specific individual.

What is talking place is an industry wide offensive, by people you will never convinced on the ground of necessity of such code or lack thereof.
They have identified programmers to be more well-off in life than the average, and less educated from a historical and philosophical point of view than the average.
This is what makes it a perfect ground for them to use their weapon, guilt, on defenseless individuals who tend to naturally rationalize things and are not naturally trained with other things.

Those who have already adopted a code would be all the more in favor of it that they are going through cognitive dissonance, a very real effect you can read about it in experimental psychology book.
But behind those second line you have professionals of code of conduct. you won't convince them with facts, that's what they sell. it is their job to convince you that you need their product.
This product is what they do for a living.

If you buy their product, it will be a good deed on the moment, as you'll make them feel good and you will provide them with some opportunity to continue.
But is the best gift you can give to them an encouragement to continue to be dependent on a fantasy world ? 
It will be an invitation for more of the same kind to come and prey...



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Misc #12004: Code of Conduct
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/12004#change-56240

* Author: Coraline Ada Ehmke
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
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I am the creator of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct for Open Source projects. At last count there are over 13,000 projects on Github that have adopted it. This past year saw adoption of Contributor Covenant by a lot of very large, very visible projects, including Rails, Github's Atom text editor, Angular JS, bundler, curl, diaspora, discourse, Eclipse, rspec, shoes, and rvm. The bundler team made code of conduct integration an option in the gem creation workflow, putting it on par with license selection. Many open source language communities have already adopted the code of conduct, including Elixir, Mono, the .NET foundation, F#, and Apple's Swift. RubyTogether also adopted a policy to only fund Ruby projects that had a solid code of conduct in place.

Right now in the PHP community there is a healthy debate about adopting the Contributor Covenant. Since it came from and has been so widely adopted by the Ruby community at large, I think it's time that we consider adopting it for the core Ruby language as well.

Our community prides itself on niceness. What a code of conduct does is define what we mean by nice. It states clearly that we value openness, courtesy, and compassion. That we care about and want contributions from people who may be different from us. That we pledge to respect all contributors regardless of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other factors. And it makes it clear that we are prepared to follow through on these values with action when and if an incident arises.

I'm asking that we join with the larger Ruby community in supporting the adoption of the Contributor Covenant for the Ruby language. I think that this will be an important step forward and will ensure the continued welcoming and supportive environment around Ruby. You can read the full text of the Contributor Covenant at http://contributor-covenant.org/version/1/3/0/ and learn more at http://contributor-covenant.org/. 

Thanks for your consideration and I look forward to hearing your thoughts.




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