Issue #10818 has been updated by Pablo Herrero.


Shugo Maeda wrote:
> Pablo Herrero wrote:
> > Does it make any difference that the refinement at Seiei's example was already active before the string evaluation?.
> 
> If eval('using M', b) in Seiei's example is changed to eval('x = 1; using M', b),
> refinements are activated in the subsequent eval.
> It's because b's environment is updated to capture the new local variable x.

I follow you there, but I meant the example where he activated the refinement outside the string, and then stored the binding at the global variable.

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Bug #10818: Extrange behaviour when apliying a refinement inside eval
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/10818#change-51380

* Author: Pablo Herrero
* Status: Assigned
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: Yukihiro Matsumoto
* ruby -v: ruby 2.2.0p0 (2014-12-25 revision 49005) [x86_64-linux]
* Backport: 2.0.0: UNKNOWN, 2.1: UNKNOWN, 2.2: UNKNOWN
----------------------------------------
When you activate a refinement inside an a string using `eval` with a binding, the refinement is sill active the next time you call `eval` with the same binding.
Strangely enough, this will only happen if there is an assignment at the code evaluated the first time. If you delete the assignment everything works as expected.

```ruby
module M
  refine String do
    def foobar; puts 'foobar'; end
  end
end

some_binding = class A; binding; end


str1 = <<EOF
a = 'something' # Without this everything works as expected
using M
'str'.foobar # Works fine
EOF

str2 = <<EOF
'str'.foobar # This time should fail but it doesn't
EOF

eval str1, some_binding
eval str2, some_binding
```

Acording to the [RefinmentsSpec](https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/projects/ruby-trunk/wiki/RefinementsSpec): "when main.using is invoked in a string given as the first argument of Kernel#eval, Kernel#instance_eval, or Module#module_eval, the end of the scope is the end of the string."

Which contradicts with this code's behavior.



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