Hi --

On Wed, 23 Nov 2005, Sean E. Russell wrote:

> On Tuesday 22 November 2005 12:31, Steven Jenkins wrote:
>> It's also valid English, but not what people would typcially say. If the
>> auxiliary phrase needs rhetorical emphasis, however, putting it first
>> makes sense:
>
> 	I'm going to the concert, if I can get the money.
>
> 	I'm going to be a doctor, unless I flunk out of college.
>
> Statements like these are not only valid, but common.  Furthermore,
>
> 	Hammer on that nail until it is flush
>
> It is much less common to hear people construct that sentence as:
>
> 	Until it is flush, hammer on that nail.

Until ready, vamp.  Until golden brown, bake.  'Til you drop, shop.

They're just not the same that way, are they? :-)

> I *like* constructions as:
>
> 	begin
> 		do_something
> 	end until foo
>
> although I'd prefer:
>
> 	loop
> 		...
> 	until foo
>
> What's really interesting is that we're debating the syntax of Ruby WRT
> sentence structures in English and German, when the language author is a
> native speaker of neither.

And Ruby *is* neither :-)  I guess it's a bit of a permathread.


David

-- 
David A. Black
dblack / wobblini.net