Issue #10040 has been updated by Nathan Broadbent.


> Nathan, Date is only available in stdlib (maybe it should be moved to core) so I don't think those literals will work for dates with "D".

I would definitely vote to move Date to core, I think that's a great idea

> 
> One possibility:
> 
> ~~~
> 20140715T == 20140715T000000
> 20140715TZ == 20140715T000000Z
> 20140715T.to_date
> ~~~

Yep, I think `20140715T` or `20140715T.to_date` could be really useful.

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Feature #10040: `%d` and `%t` shorthands for `Date.new(*args)` and `Time.new(*args)`
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/10040#change-47812

* Author: Nathan Broadbent
* Status: Open
* Priority: Normal
* Assignee: 
* Category: 
* Target version: 
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I'm working on a Ruby application where we have to deal with a lot of dates and times, especially in our test suite. We currently have a couple thousand cases of `Date.new(...)`, and I'm finding the syntax to be a little unwieldy.

What do you think about the following shorthand suggestions?

```ruby
%d(2014, 7, 15)                 # Equivalent to: Date.new(2014, 7, 15)
%t(2014, 7, 15, 12, 58, 45)     # Equivalent to: Time.new(2014, 7, 15, 12, 58, 45)
```
I added commas because I think the syntax should also support variables:

```ruby
year = 2014
month = 7
%d(year, month, 15)             # Equivalent to: Date.new(year, month, 15)
```
I understand that this will operate a bit differently to `%w` and `%i`, but I think that supporting variable evaluation would be a lot more useful.

An alternative proposal would be to add `[]` methods to `Date` and `Time`, so that we could call:

```ruby
Date[2014, 7, 15]
Time[2014, 7, 15, 12, 58, 43]
```
This would be still be a little shorter and nicer to use. Please let me know if you would like me to open a feature ticket for `Date.[]` and `Time.[]` methods, instead.

Please let me know your thoughts. Would you find a shorter date/time syntax useful?



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