Issue #9076 has been updated by Matthew Kerwin.


 On 3 March 2014 08:37, <sowieso / dukun.de> wrote:
 
 > Issue #9076 has been updated by So Wieso.
 >
 >
 > Matthew Kerwin wrote:
 > > I share concerns that have been voiced earlier in the thread.
 > >
 > > This code snippet: `foo &.bar` *looks* like you're either passing
 > `&.bar` as the first positional parameter to foo, or casting `.bar` to a
 > Proc and passing it as the block parameter. You might argue that that *is*
 > what you're doing, but it's not; `.bar` isn't a thing that can be
 > #to_proc'd, and `&` isn't an object you can send method calls. What we end
 > up doing is confusing the syntax, adding a third option which looks like a
 > hybrid of the others, but is something else again.
 >
 > You are totally right, this is yet another use for &. But if you take the
 > new rule, it is not really confusing, just parse it like explained when you
 > see & followed by a dot.
 
 
 I think it's pretty confusing, and some of the conversation upthread seems
 to agree. I don't like having to carefully read and parse code to see if
 it's & or . or &. -- I'm not a computer, I don't read that way.
 
 > I think the ampex gem better captures the intent here by both using the
 > `&` sigil/operator to clearly indicate that Proc->block magic is happening,
 > and by providing an explicit object to receive the method calls. Of course
 > it could never be promoted to core, because the name 'X' is far too
 > valuable and I doubt anyone could come up with a better one, but personally
 > I'm happy enough that the gem exists and can be used by those to whom it
 > would be of benefit.
 >
 > I agree, X is a no-go. Wouldn't any symbol (in ascii) be possible? (`map
 > &@.to_s`, or even `map @.to_s`)
 >
 
 It may be possible, but I don't like Perl's sigil-heavy and
 magic-variable-creating voodoo, and I'd much prefer Ruby to keep it limited
 to what it already has. I think X is perfectly apt for the gem; there's a
 very strong convention that 'i' is the index in a loop and 'x' is the item,
 so having a globally defined X is sensible, it's just a bit too broad of a
 brush for the core.
 
 And @ (and @@) are class scoping sigils, so they're not appropriate here.
 
 
 > > And if it's too slow for you, write out the full code, even if that
 > means creating a throw-away variable in your block. We like variables, they
 > show us what our code is doing. I doubt it's a goal of the language to
 > remove them.
 >
 > I disagree here. The usual one-letter-variables in real code do not show
 > anything. This implementation would still force us to give them a name if
 > we want to use them more than once, which is a compromise on a good level.
 >
 
 They show us several things: precisely where the variable comes from
 (again, I can't stand Perl's $_ just appearing -- or worse, changing -- in
 random places), precisely where and how it's used, and if it's called "x"
 it also strongly suggests that it's the item in an iteration that doesn't
 have an particular meaning outside the context of the iteration (unless
 we're doing something with coordinates, in which case context should be
 enough to inform the difference).
 
 
 >
 > What if we do it like this?
 > `[1,2,3,4].map{.to_s(2)}.reverse
 > => ["100", "11", "10", "1"]`
 > When there is no receiver for a method-call (can only be the first
 > method-call in a block), send the message to yielded argument.
 >
 
 I think this has been proposed before. You'd have to clearly enumerate
 edge cases (e.g.: `def each() yield; yield 1, 2; end`), and it still
 doesn't look great.
 
 To summarise my opinion: I agree that there's a lot of value in being able
 to brain-dump the equivalent of `foo.map{|x|x.to_s(2)}` without having to
 break your train of thought, but I don't think `&.` is the right way.
 
 -- 
   Matthew Kerwin
   http://matthew.kerwin.net.au/

----------------------------------------
Feature #9076: New one-argument block syntax: &.
https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/9076#change-45584

* Author: Ary Borenszweig
* Status: Feedback
* Priority: Low
* Assignee: 
* Category: core
* Target version: Next Major
----------------------------------------
Hello,

I'd like to introduce a new syntax for blocks that have one argument.

Currently you can do this:

[1, 2, 3].map &:to_s

With the proposed syntax this will be written as:

[1, 2, 3].map &.to_s

Instead of ":" we use a ".".

The idea is that this new syntax is just syntax sugar that is expanded by the parser to this:

[1, 2, 3].map { |arg| arg.to_s }

This new syntax allows passing arguments:

[1, 2, 3, 4].map &.to_s(2) #=> ["1", "10", "11", "100"]

It also allows chaining calls:

[1, 10, 100].map &.to_s.length #=> [1, 2, 3]

You can also use another block:

[[1, -2], [-3, -4]].map &.map &.abs #=> [[1, 2], [3, 4]]

Pros:
- Doesn't conflict with any existing syntax, because that now gives a syntax error, so it is available.
- Allows passing arguments and chaining calls
- It's *fast*: it's just syntax sugar. The "&:to_s" is slower because the to_proc method is invoked, you have a cache of procs, etc.
- It looks ok (in my opinion) and allows very nice functional code (like the last example).

Cons:
- Only supports one (implicit) argument. But this is the same limitation of "&:to_s". If you want more than one argument, use the traditional block syntax.
- It's a new syntax, so users need to learn it. But to defend this point, users right now need to understand the &:to_s syntax, which is hard to explain (this calls the "to_proc" method of Symbol, which creates a block... vs. "it's just syntax sugar for")

What do you think?

We are using this syntax in a new language we are doing, Crystal, which has a syntax very similar to Ruby, and so far we think it's nice, simple and powerful. You can read more about it here: http://crystal-lang.org/2013/09/15/to-proc.html



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