2013/9/10 sawa (Tsuyoshi Sawada) <sawadatsuyoshi / gmail.com>:
> Bug #8885: Incorrect time is created for time including leap seconds
> https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/8885

> ruby -v: 2.0

> `Time.new` creates incorrect time when the time includes a leap second.
>
>     Time.new(2012, 6, 30, 23, 59, 60)
>     # => 2012-07-01 00:00:00 +0900 # Wrong. Should be 2012-06-30 23:59:60 +0900
>
>     Time.new(2012, 6, 30, 23, 59, 60) == Time.new(2012, 7, 1, 0, 0, 0)
>     # => true # Wrong. Should be `false`.

At first, please confirm your enviroment (OS and configuration)
supports leap seconds.
Ruby supports leap seconds only if your environment supports leap seconds.

What is your OS?
The command line, ruby -v, shows the ruby version including your OS.
But you didn't fill the entry of the form as the result of the command line.
("2.0" is not a proper result of ruby -v.)
Example:
  % ruby -v
  ruby 2.1.0dev (2013-08-16 trunk 42586) [x86_64-linux]

What is the value of TZ environment variable?
Some (Unix) environment sees TZ environment variable to determine to
support leap seconds or not.
(The value prefixed with "right/" may indicate leap seconds support.)

What the result of the following command?
  % ruby -e '3.times {|i| p Time.at(78796799+i) }'

The command shows Time class behavior around the first leap second,
1972-06-30T23:59:60Z.

Environment which supports leap seconds:
  % TZ=right/UTC ruby -e '3.times {|i| p Time.at(78796799+i) }'
  1972-06-30 23:59:59 +0000
  1972-06-30 23:59:60 +0000
  1972-07-01 00:00:00 +0000

Environment which doesn't support leap seconds:
  % TZ=UTC ruby -e '3.times {|i| p Time.at(78796799+i) }'
  1972-06-30 23:59:59 +0000
  1972-07-01 00:00:00 +0000
  1972-07-01 00:00:01 +0000
-- 
Tanaka Akira