24.08.2013 23:55 =D0=CF=CC=D8=DA=CF=D7=C1=D4=C5=CC=D8 "kstephens (Kurt Step=
hens)" <
redmine / ruby-lang.org> =CE=C1=D0=C9=D3=C1=CC:
>
>
> Issue #8579 has been updated by kstephens (Kurt  Stephens).
>
>
> How about something more generic?  A prefix operator that memoizes and
freezes any expression result in a thread-safe manner on first eval:
>
>     %f'a frozen string'                 #
>     %f"a frozen #{interpolated} string" #
>     %f{a: 'frozen', :hash 'value'}      # A frozen, inline memoized Hash.
>     %f[:a, 'frozen', :array, 'value']   # A frozen, inline, memoized
Array.
>     %f(some(:method, 'call'))           # You get the idea.

Looks pretty! +1

> ----------------------------------------
> Feature #8579: Frozen string syntax
> https://bugs.ruby-lang.org/issues/8579#change-41341
>
> Author: charliesome (Charlie Somerville)
> Status: Open
> Priority: Normal
> Assignee: ko1 (Koichi Sasada)
> Category: syntax
> Target version: current: 2.1.0
>
>
> I'd like to propose a new type of string literal - %f().
>
> Because Ruby strings are mutable, every time a string literal is
evaluated a new String object must be duped.
>
> It's quite common to see code that stores a frozen String object into a
constant which is then reused for performance reasons. Example:
https://github.com/rack/rack/blob/master/lib/rack/methodoverride.rb
>
> A new %f() string literal would instead evaluate to the same frozen
String object every time. The benefit of this syntax is that it removes the
need to pull string literals away from where they are used.
>
> Here's an example of the proposed %f() syntax in action:
>
>     def foo
>       ["bar".object_id, %f(bar).object_id]
>     end
>
>     p foo # might print "[123, 456]"
>
>     p foo # might print "[789, 456]"
>
> These string literals could also be stored into a global refcounted table
for deduplication across the entire program, futher reducing memory usage.
>
> If this proposal is accepted, I can handle implementation work.
>
>
> --
> http://bugs.ruby-lang.org/