Hello,

2011/11/11 Luis Lavena <luislavena / gmail.com>:
> Most of the time this is done using cross-compilation tools were the
> extension is cross compiled against different versions of the cross
> compiled Ruby and then packaged inside the gem.

I didn't know a cross-compilation is used.  Why it is needed?
Sorry for my ignorance.


I had thought the development process of gems in windows is:

1. install windows.
2. install a compiler (such as vc++ or mingw).
3. install third party's libraries they need (such as openssl).
4. install the versions of Ruby which you're likely to support.
5. develop, build and test your gems by using the compiler,
   libraries and each version of Ruby.
6. create and release a gem package.


To add support for a new version of Ruby, the extra process is:

7. install the new version of Ruby.
8. build and test your gems by using the already-installed
   compiler, libraries and the new Ruby.
9. create and release a new gem package.


I think this extra process does not change even whether the gem
depends on the third party's libraries or not, because they have
already installed the libraries.
Maybe I'm missing something.  32 bit / 64 bit?


> Please apologize if my english isn't clear, I'm not a native english
> speaker and trying to explain the issue the more graphical as
> possible.

Don't mind, my English skill is definitely poorer than you :-)
I'm sorry to trouble you.

-- 
Yusuke Endoh <mame / tsg.ne.jp>