Issue #4102 has been updated by Tom Wardrop.


Thanks for the tips Magnus, they're very handy. I forget that begin ... end can be used just about anywhere to encapsulate multiple expressions that lead to a single result. The #tap method I simply had no idea about.

Cheers
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Feature #4102: Proposal for 'let'. A new approach using block-defaults in 1.9
http://redmine.ruby-lang.org/issues/4102

Author: john mair
Status: Open
Priority: Normal
Assignee: 
Category: 
Target version: 


=begin
 This is a very simple function, it would be implemented as follows:
 
     module Kernel
       private
       def let() yield end
     end
 
 First of all, do not dismiss this functionality out of hand because of 
 its simplicity.
 
 Even though it is just a 'yield', when it is combined with Ruby 1.9's 
 block defaults and new block-variable scoping rules it is actually quite 
 powerful and it behaves exactly like a let* in lisp.
 
 Some advantages of this functionality are:
 (1) Gives you precise control over the scope of your variables.
 
 I note that after the publication of "Metaprogramming in Ruby" by Paolo 
 Perrotta the following idiom has started to appear:
 
     proc do
       ..my code..
     end.call
 
 It is used exactly as the proposed 'let' would be used, but is 
 syntactically much uglier.
 
 Yes, i know an alternative is to just make shorter and smaller methods. 
 But is the ability to control and restrict scope ever a bad thing?
 
 (2) Testing and teaching about blocks.
 
 As the proposed 'let' simply yields to a block it can be used to 
 illustrate block behaviour and block concepts to a new Ruby programmer. 
 It also may be useful to an experienced programmer when trying out new 
 ideas.
 
 Here are some example uses of the proposed 'let':
 
 Example 1: Carve out a temporary scope, make 'x' local to that scope
 
     x = :outer
     let { |x| x = :inner } #=> :inner
     x #=> :outer
 
 Example 2: Here we use Ruby 1.9's block-defaults to make 'y' block-local 
 and give it a value:
 
     let { |y=10| y } #=> 10
 
 Example 3: Make 'x' and 'y' block-local and have 'y' value depend on 'x' 
 (equivalent to let* in lisp)
 
     let { |x=10, y=(2*x)| [x, y] } #=> [10, 20]
 
 In summary, I think this proposal should succeed for the following 
 reasons:
 (1) It is an exceptionally simple implementation.
 (2) More control over scope is never a bad thing.
 (3) I have seen people re-implementing this functionality themselves 
 using: proc { ..code.. }.call
 (4) It is very useful for teaching and testing block behaviour.
 
 Thanks,
 
 John
=end



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