Am Fri, 7 Jan 2011 00:57:44 +0900
schrieb mathew <meta / pobox.com>:

> > I believe this discussion was restarted specifically because there
> > has been a lot of willingness from Ruby users in the community to
> > be able to contribute, but they were only familiar with Git and SVN
> > was a blocker (the workflow makes it too complicated for them--
> > this is reasonable).
> 
> Oh, give me a break. The "workflow" with SVN is no harder than with
> any other version control system. If they can't handle
> 
> % svn co http://svn.ruby-lang.org/repos/ruby/trunk ruby
> % [ hack hack hack ]
> % svn diff > my.patch
> 
> then it's probably best that they don't contribute.
> 
> Git may have many virtues, but ease of use relative to other VCSs
> isn't one of them.

I think Loren means the other parts of the workflow for a third party
(as in not main) developer to contribute. I am sure that the 3 steps
you've shown above are possible/essential for every VCS. But what
happens after the "foreign" dev has created the patch? He mails it to
ruby-core. Errors (in the .patch) are found, typos are fixed and after
several days you have the twenty-third incarnation of this patch flying
around only on this very mailing list.

Maybe it gets accepted, maybe not. Anyway, the core members have to keep
a list of (already applied) patches in mind, which does not result in
an open progress. The only way to trace this patch is reading the ML
and finding the patch snippet manually.

I am new at this list, but I bet the above scenario happened more than
once. I do NOT want to convince core* to switch to git, or promote it
cheaply. But the above could be avoided by a more open progress - and
this can be accomplished by a DVCS with good web support. Git was
optimized for collaboration.

Niklas
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