Issue #340 has been updated by Jon Forums.


>I understand the worth of LLVM.
> But this ticket is not about compiling into LLVM bytecode, but
> compiling into *normal object file* with llvm-gcc, isn't it?

My understanding of the issue is similar to yours; whether llvm-gcc can be used to compile Ruby into normal object files.

My impression (perhaps incorrect) was also that the ticket's concern was whether the build environment could be made to allow the use of llvm-gcc as a compiler.

FWIW, my current interest is in using llvm-gcc to build Ruby to take advantage of the following:

* LLVM optimizer - LLVM replaces GCC's optimizer and code generator (execution time, compile time, generated code size)
* safe to mix and match .o files between GCC and LLVM-gcc compilers
* safe to call into other libraries build by other compilers

Whether the above turn out to be true, I'm still investigating.  However I've had good results so far as I try using the MinGW port of llvm-gcc (as a compiler) for building gvim and Python extensions on Windows and as time permits, I plan to test more with Ruby.  As such, I'm also interested in Ruby and Ruby's build system being able to use llvm-gcc as a compiler.

If I misunderstood the ticket's real issue, pardon the noise.

Jon


p.s. - fyi, there are other build issues I've found when using llvm-gcc such as ensuring binutils windres calls the correct compiler when handling Windows resource files, such as adding something like the following to rules:

$(WINDRES) --preprocessor="$(CC) -E -xc" -DRC_INVOKED

p.p.s - If you get a chance and haven't done so already, take a look at the "LLVM as a C and C++ compiler" section of the above mentioned PDF for some SPEC 2000 results.
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