Hi,

At Wed, 12 May 2004 12:50:55 +0900,
Dave Thomas wrote in [ruby-core:02865]:
> but I'm not sure what to put for the "....".  If I just put printable 
> characters (like まつもとゆきひろ) then I'm not going to be illustrating the 
> encoding used. (I suspect the encoding on this e-mail won't let the 
> above through. If it doesn't, I cut and pasted Matz's name).

Like this?
$ ruby -rnkf -e 'p NKF.guess("\e$B$^$D$b$H$f$-$R$m\e(B")'
1
$ ruby -rnkf -e 'p NKF.guess("\244\336\244\304\244\342\244\310\244\346\244\255\244\322\244\355")'
2
$ ruby -rnkf -e 'p NKF.guess("\202\334\202\302\202\340\202\306\202\344\202\253\202\320\202\353")'
3

> So, what would a Japanese speaker use to illustrate the use of NKF? 
> Would you show the octal string instead? How would you enter it?

$ ruby -e 'p *ARGV' まつもとゆきひろ
"\244\336\244\304\244\342\244\310\244\346\244\255\244\322\244\355"
$ ruby -rnkf -e 'p NKF.nkf(*ARGV)' -- -Es まつもとゆきひろ
"\202\334\202\302\202\340\202\306\202\344\202\253\202\320\202\353"
$ ruby -rnkf -e 'p NKF.nkf(*ARGV)' -- -Ej まつもとゆきひろ
"\e$B$^$D$b$H$f$-$R$m\e(B"

-- 
Nobu Nakada