+1

Sylvain describes my situation exactly.
I'm a CVS dinosaur whose recently realized that I've got to evolve to
survive.
And, like many other Ruby "non-committers", the hassle of tracking the
moving target 
at HEAD seriously dampens my enthusiasm.

Git may or may not be the best distributed source management tool, but it
would
be silly to choose some other DSCM for the core interpreter given that 
many of the large Ruby apps and libraries have already moved to git.

- brent

P.S.  Can anyone suggest a good, gentle introduction to git for mere
mortals, lest
I repeat Eric Hodel's negative experiences with it?



Bugzilla from sylvain.joyeux / m4x.org wrote:
> 
> 
> Of course, but the experience of being a non-committer who still tries
> to improve ruby is also important. Honestly, I think it is even more
> important. The basic asymmetry of centralized VCSs makes the workflow of
> a committer always much better than the one of a non-commiter since the
> non-commiters have little access to the VCS services. And one experience
> of one non-committer is: it sucks badly.
> 
> This is mainly because non-trivial patches (and even trivial ones) tend
> to stay quite long in the bug tracker. Which means that you basically
> have, as a non-committer, to update your patch over and over again to
> the newest HEAD. I did that with svn, it is horrible (you have to do it
> by hand). I do that now with git and it works like a charm (thanks to
> rebase).
> 
> Another thing: maintaining the ChangeLog file. This thing looks very
> stupid, and makes merging horrible (you basically always have a conflict
> on ChangeLog, for obvious reasons). I thought first that it was a
> workaround from the good'ol days of CVS and even started to write a
> script that would generate it. Then I realized that it was not doable
> with SVN since there are no merges. Stupid.
> 
> Sylvain
> 
> 
> 
> 

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