Martin Duerst schrieb:
> This is a purely personal opinion, but my suggestion is that
> the best thing you can do is provide patches (i.e. parts
> of the missing documentation). If there's something you can't
> figure out, just leave it out or ask a question in your issue.
> If there's something that looks like a bug (e.g. the "Fibers don't
> call initialize" below), file a bug report (on the functionality,
> not the documentation), and it should be either be acted upon or
> rejected, which will give you an answer.

Sorry, but this is a really frustrating answer. It is a fact that 
Florian and I are Ruby users and not heading for be involved into the 
Ruby development due to personal time constraints.

Some weeks ago it was stated, that a feature freeze for Ruby 1.9.1 
planned for beginning 2009 has taken place, but that the first version 
may have several bugs, because Ruby 1.9 is not used by many persons.

Some days ago Florian had a questing about Fibers in the German Ruby 
forum. Based on sparse information in some blogs about Fibers we made 
some experiments.

By playing with this class I recognized two behaviours that were somehow 
strange, because they usually work fine in Ruby. I asked inside the 
German forum and got the answer, that it was reproducable, but not 
understandable.

So - I always thought, that ruby-core is the right place to inform the 
Ruby development about such things. Especially in this case an answer 
should be very easy (planned behaviour or bug), because feature freeze 
did already happen.

If a normal Ruby user is enforced to use the change and problem 
management for Ruby development will enforce the typical user not to 
report things like this, because he/she didn't want to invest more time.

Wolfgang Ndasi-Donner